Monthly Archives: June 2011

Node.js on Azure or the importance of knowing history

 

Today’s rage on the blogsphere is the news that Microsoft and Joyent are working together in order to have a native windows port of Node.js that will work on Azure (and off course Windows going back to 2003).

For example one of the reports 

Node.js is an implementation that allows you to run javascript on a web server using an evented model (as opposed to a thread one) which is blazingly fast because of it’s evented nature and because it uses V8 (the javascript engine that powers Google’s Chrome) as it’s virtual machine.

This is good news for Azure and it’s one more option for people who are thinking of deploying to Azure but don’t want to use the full Microsoft stack.  Since there are other Cloud vendors that already support Node.js (besides Joyent) Heroku recently announced that it also supports Node.js besides Ruby, this means people have one more cloud provider on their list.

But what bothers me the most on some of these posts, is there are a lot of people saying this means that Microsoft is finally acknowledging that using Javascript on the server is viable (or even possible). People who either don’t know history or are not capable of doing a decent due dilligence process.

Microsoft has supported javascript development on the server as long as I can remember (in a previous life I’ve written thousands of JScript code running on windows 2000). It is supported at least since ASP 2.0 (probably 1.0 but I’m too lazy to check it out). Contrary to popular believe Classic ASP supported out of the box two scripting languages: VBScript and Javascript (in fact it supported any language implementing active scripting, so it could work with things like PerlScript, TCL or Python).

Come on folks it is not that hard to do due dilligence. Smile

As a somehow related note I hear the IronJS is also making good progress as a Javascript implementation running under .NET DLR

ALM Rangers shipped Build Customization Guide

 

The ALM Rangers Build Customization Guide has gone gold and the RTM version has been released into the wild.

If you are new to TFS team build or you are familiar with it but want to learn more about, this guide is a very valuable resource.

It contains complete guidance of how you can enhance or fully customize your build templates.

If you are the sort of person who likes to learn by example hands on labs are also included to guide you to learn a lot of things using task driven examples.

If you are the sort of person who doesn’t has the patience to read you it also contains some quick videos to showcase you the guidance (great for telecommuters Smile)

You can read it more about it here on Rangers blog announcement post or the project table of content blog post or if you are in an hurry you can go directly to the project site on codeplex (rabcg.codeplex.com/) to get the bits.

The Team on this project

Adimulam Sudheer, André Dias, Bill Heys, Bijan Javidi, Bob Hardister, Brian Blackman, Brian Minisi, Daniel Franco Abrahão de Oliveira, David Corbin, Ed Blankenship, Ewald Hofman, Fabio Casado, Francisco Xavier Fagas Albarracín, Giulio Vian, Hassan Fadili, Jahangeer Mohammed, Jeff Bramwell, Jens K. Süßmeyer, Jim Lamb, John Jacob (JJ), Joseph Abukhader, Leonard S. Woody III, Mathias Olausson, Mike Douglas , Mike Fourie, Nico Orschel, Oliver Hilgers, Patricia Wagner, Petr Moravek, Pierre Donyegro, Richard Fennell, Silfarney Wallace, Steven Lange, Stuart Preston, Sven Hubert, Thomas Schissler, Tiago Pascoal, Tim Star, William Bartholomew, Willy-Peter Schaub

ALM Rangers shipped Lab Management Guide

 

The ALM Rangers Lab Management Guide has gone gold and the RTM version has been released into the wild.

This project is a huge resource if you want to learn more about lab management and all of it’s related features.

Not only it contains hands on guidance (planning, setup, configuration and usage), but it also contains hands on labs that can take you up to speed to lab management in an easy way.

You can read it more about it here on Rangers blog announcement post or the project table of content blog post or if you are in an hurry you can go directly to the project site on codeplex (ralabman.codeplex.com/) to get the bits.

The Team on this project

Adimulam Sudheer, Akhil Walia, Bijan Javidi, Brian Minisi, Bob Hardister, Chris Burrows, Christian Nielsen, Ewald Hofman, Francisco Fagas, Giulio Vian, Harish Reddy Kothapalli, Hassan Fadili, Jahangeer Mohammed, Kris Lankford, Mark Nichols, Mathias Olausson, Micheal Learned, Pål Bendiksen, Patricia Wagner, Paul Meyer, Pieter Gheysens, Richard Florance, Rui Melo, Siraj Syed, Sven Hubert, Thomas Schissler, Tony Feissle, Vijay Machiraju, Willy-Peter Schaub, Zayd Kara

Apologies from some unlinked persons.

My upcoming talks for June

 

The last few months have been just crazy. Been pretty busy and I thought now that we are entering June things were going to calm down a little.

But not it seems June is going to be another crazy month, so besides the talk I did on the MS ALM event a few days ago, on June I’m going to do two public talks (and new one seems to be rails).

The first will be a session on Prompt about ALM in general (what is ALM, associated software engineering practices, like builds, source control, branching, continuous integration, continuous deployment and some things I’m still going to add to the talk Smile)). Prompt is post graduation in programming methods and technology given by a Lisbon Superior Engineering Institute

This event will be free and since the seats are limited, admission will be on a first come first served basis. (requires registration). More info and registration here

My second talk will be at the Agile Portugal conference which is going to be held on the 21st and 22nd of June in Porto.  I’m going to give a short talk with the highly provocative title Tester’s fate in an Agile World: Extinction or Evolution?  I intend to  talk about the role (is there a role for them? Smile) of testers in an Agile team and how Microsoft Test Manager can help testers better gel with the developers. I hope I can pull it off, and live up to the hyped title. Smile